Another raptor-type dinosaur found

raptor-type dinosaurAnother raptor-type dinosaur found.

“’Based on the findings so far, we assume that the dinosaur is something close to a Microraptor or others in the raptor genera,” said Lim Jong-deock, chief curator of the National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage. “However, it’s uncertain at this stage exactly which type of dinosaur it was, and there is a chance that it is a new type that hasn’t been reported to academia as of yet.’”

“Microraptors are bird-like dinosaurs from the Cretaceous period. They measure between 77 and 90 centimeters (30 and 35 inches), weigh just one or two kilograms (2.2 or 4.4 pounds) and have feathered wings. They were the smallest carnivorous dinosaurs and were believed to have eaten insects or other animals.”

http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=2997736

2014 Puget Sound Bird Fest is this weekend

2014 Puget Sound Bird Fest

 Yost Park Guided Walk for Kids and Families: Saturday, 5:30-6:30 PM
FREE, No registration required, meet in the parking lot at Yost Park.

Join Lorenzo Rohani, photographer and author of A Kid’s Guide to Birding, along with a guide from Pilchuck Audubon for an afternoon birding walk through the woods and along the stream that meanders through Yost Park.  Learn about the habitat that supports the resident and migratory species of birds found in the park.  Practice your skills looking and listening for birds and experience the joy of identifying each species observed on the walk.  Yost Park is 5 minutes away from the Frances Anderson Center, at 9535 Bowdoin Way, so you can easily get there in time for the walk after the last presentation of the day

Dinosaurs Into Birds

If you want to better understand how Dinosaurs Shrunk Into Birds check out this Video

“Arms into feathered wings; bones hollowing out; morphology minimizing: The lineage of modern day birds includes the Tyrannosaurus and the Velociraptor, dating back over 50 million years. Common traits from Neotheropoda to Archaeopteryx”

http://www.livescience.com/47125-dinosaurs-shrinkage-into-birds-explained-video.htmlDinosaurs’ 'Shrinkage' Into Birds Explained

Christmas Bird Count for Kids

Christmas Bird Count

Christmas Bird Count for Kids

Plan early. Here’s something for kids: “The Christmas Bird Count for Kids is one of these important new volunteer movements that is gaining popularity across North America from Alaska to Florida. Thanks to some of that exhilarating Northern California innovation and creativity from co-founders Tom Rusert and Darren Peterie in Sonoma, along with their partner Bird Studies Canada, this holiday event is sweeping North America.”

Find out more at: http://ebird.org/content/ybn/news/cbc4kids/

And: http://www.sonomabirding.com/cbc4kids_history.html

Acorn Woodpeckers!

The Acorn Woodpecker is one of the world’s most interesting birds. It lives in groups and has developed an unusual practice of storing thousands of acorns in holes they specially drill in the bark and dead limbs of trees—called “granary” trees. As the acorns age, they shrink, so the woodpeckers check them and occasionally relocate them to tighter holes to prevent them from falling out. These birds live in groups so they can keep an eye out for acorn thieves, such as squirrels. It has a distinctive parrot-like call.

The Acorn Woodpecker has been on our wish list for years. It’s range reaches a few hundred miles south of our usual birding locations, so we needed to do a bit of traveling to find them. This winter, while visiting Southern California we got some helpful tips for finding them from a park ranger and were able to make our first sightings in the Santa Monica Mountains. Here are some photos of this amazing bird and the granaries they create.