Othello Sandhill Crane Festival (19th Annual)

Just got back from our first time attending the Annual Othello Sandhill Crane Festival (March 18-20).

Years ago we were in the Columbia Basin area to find Sandhill Cranes and were fortunate enough to see thousands of them. A few photos from that trip are included in our book, A Kid’s Guide to Birding. The natural landscape there is spectacular on its own, but with huge numbers of cranes, it was like something you would only imagine existing in the earlier days of exploration.

So when an invitation to speak at the festival came from the organizers in Othello, we were more than happy to head back out to the area.

So let me tell you about this festival. It is fantastic! The festival’s organizers put a lot of effort and careful planning into the event. There were regular scheduled buses and vans taking people out to the best wildlife viewing areas (which also included private agricultural areas) as well as areas of geological interest. Breakfast was served on Saturday and there was a Banquet in the evening along with one of the keynote speakers. All the speakers had impressive credentials and did great presentations. There were displays, book sales, and more. But what impressed me the most was the incredible community involvement, with both young and old involved in all sorts of ways. I was beginning to wonder if there was a town ordinance that required everyone to be involved, because it seemed like everyone and every organization had some role in helping the event come together.

So make plans to be there for the next one, the “20th annual” Sandhill Crane Festival in 2017. But book early because when we tried, ever hotel in the area was fully booked!

Here are a few photos from the trip.

Annual Othello Sandhill Crane Festival
Sign on the way into Othello. Nothing better than a community that appreciates its wildlife.

 

 

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Columbia National Wildlife Refuge
Columbia National Wildlife Refuge, just north of Othello, Washington.
Coyote in Columbia National Wildlife Refuge
Howling Coyote in Columbia National Wildlife Refuge. A little hard to spot, but near the center of the photo.
The Crab Creek road
The Crab Creek road southwest of Othello

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It is very quit out in this landscape, apart from bird song, and in this instance the huge sound of thousands of geese.
It is very quiet out in this landscape — apart from bird song, and in this instance, the huge sound of thousands of geese.
Geese, Crab Creek
Large flock of geese flying near the Crab Creek area.
American kestrel
American kestrel
Western Meadowlark
Western meadowlark. This bird has an amazing ability to project sound.
Western Meadowlark
Western Meadowlark
Northern Harrier
Northern Harrier
Northern Harrier
Northern Harrier — an elegant looking raptor that sometimes flies low and slow while hunting.
Annual Othello Sandhill Crane Festival
Othello Sandhill Crane Festival brochure
Othello Sandhill Crane Festival
Othello Sandhill Crane Festival brochure with the “Kid’s Guide to Birding” announcement.
Porcupine in Columbia National Wildlife Refuge.
A porcupine — normally nocturnal, so this is an unexpected site.
When we arrived, organizer Marie Lotz had arranged a special and unexpected private tour for us by Randy Hill, former USFWS biologist, who had an encyclopedic knowledge of the area and the wildlife.
When we arrived, organizer Marie Lotz had arranged a special and unexpected private tour for us with Randy Hill, former USFWS biologist, who had an encyclopedic knowledge of the area and the wildlife.
Loggerhead Shrike
Loggerhead Shrike. These are wanna-be raptors that are known for impaling their prey on thorns and barbed wire.
Sandhill Cranes
Sandhill Cranes in corn field. They are almost 3.5ft tall and have a loud and cool Jurassic Park sound that is impressive even when they are only a few of them around. But being a very social bird, they often gather in the thousands.

 

An Osprey Dive

Lorenzo was invited by Everett Parks & Recreation to lead the Aquanauts Science Camp on a birding trip to Spencer Island (July 21, 2015). Bird sightings included Great Blue Herons, Cedar Waxwings, Killdeer, Caspian Terns, Marsh Wrens, Red-wing blackbirds, and Belted Kingfishers. The highlight was Osprey doing repeated dives for fish as shown in the photo sequence taken by Lorenzo. Notice in image #3 how the Osprey goes down with feet first before reaching the water.


Spencer Island
is a 400-acre island in the Snohomish River estuary.

Another raptor-type dinosaur found

raptor-type dinosaurAnother raptor-type dinosaur found.

“’Based on the findings so far, we assume that the dinosaur is something close to a Microraptor or others in the raptor genera,” said Lim Jong-deock, chief curator of the National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage. “However, it’s uncertain at this stage exactly which type of dinosaur it was, and there is a chance that it is a new type that hasn’t been reported to academia as of yet.’”

“Microraptors are bird-like dinosaurs from the Cretaceous period. They measure between 77 and 90 centimeters (30 and 35 inches), weigh just one or two kilograms (2.2 or 4.4 pounds) and have feathered wings. They were the smallest carnivorous dinosaurs and were believed to have eaten insects or other animals.”

http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=2997736

2014 Puget Sound Bird Fest is this weekend

2014 Puget Sound Bird Fest

 Yost Park Guided Walk for Kids and Families: Saturday, 5:30-6:30 PM
FREE, No registration required, meet in the parking lot at Yost Park.

Join Lorenzo Rohani, photographer and author of A Kid’s Guide to Birding, along with a guide from Pilchuck Audubon for an afternoon birding walk through the woods and along the stream that meanders through Yost Park.  Learn about the habitat that supports the resident and migratory species of birds found in the park.  Practice your skills looking and listening for birds and experience the joy of identifying each species observed on the walk.  Yost Park is 5 minutes away from the Frances Anderson Center, at 9535 Bowdoin Way, so you can easily get there in time for the walk after the last presentation of the day